Author Archive | DTTadmin2015

Thinking Differently: An Inspiring Guide for Parents of Children with Learning Disabilities

David Flink

An innovative, comprehensive guide—the first of its kind—to help parents understand and accept learning disabilities in their children, offering tips and strategies for successfully advocating on their behalf and helping them become their own best advocates.

In Thinking Differently, David Flink, the leader of Eye to Eye—a national mentoring program for students with learning and attention issues—enlarges our understanding of the learning process and offers powerful, innovative strategies for parenting, teaching, and supporting the 20 percent of students with learning disabilities. An outstanding fighter who has helped thousands of children adapt to their specific learning issues, Flink understands the needs and experiences of these children first hand. He, too, has dyslexia and ADHD.

Focusing on how to arm students who think and learn differently with essential skills, including meta-cognition and self-advocacy, Flink offers real, hard advice, providing the tools to address specific problems they face—from building self-esteem and reconstructing the learning environment, to getting proper diagnoses and discovering their inner gifts. With his easy, hands-on “Step-by-Step Launchpad to Empowerment,” parents can take immediate steps to improve their children’s lives.

Thinking Differently is a brilliant, compassionate work, packed with essential insights and real-world applications indispensable for parents, educators, and other professional involved with children with learning disabilities.

“The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan” by Ben Foss

Random House Publishing Group, Aug 27, 2013

Finally, a groundbreaking book that reveals what your dyslexic child is experiencing—and what you can do so that he or she will thrive

More than thirty million people in the United States are dyslexic—a brain-based genetic trait, often labeled as a “learning disability” or “learning difference,” that makes interpreting text and reading difficult. Yet even though children with dyslexia may have trouble reading, they don’t have any problems learning; dyslexia has nothing to do with a lack of intellect.

While other books tell you what dyslexia is, this book tells you what to do. Dyslexics’ innate skills, which may include verbal, social, spatial, kinesthetic, visual, mathematical, or musical abilities, are their unique key to acquiring knowledge. Figuring out where their individual strengths lie, and then harnessing these skills, offers an entrée into learning and excelling. And by keeping the focus on learning, not on standard reading the same way everyone else does, a child with dyslexia can and will develop the self-confidence to flourish in the classroom and beyond.

After years of battling with a school system that did not understand his dyslexia and the shame that accompanied it, renowned activist and entrepreneur Ben Foss is not only open about his dyslexia, he is proud of it. In The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan he shares his personal triumphs and failures so that you can learn from his experiences, and provides a three-step approach for success:

• Identify your child’s profile: By mapping your child’s strengths and weaknesses and assisting her to better understand who she is, you can help your child move away from shame and feelings of inadequacy and move toward creating a powerful program for learning.
• Help your child help himself: Coach your child to become his own best advocate by developing resiliency, confidence, and self-awareness, and focusing on achievable goals in areas that matter most to him.
• Create community: Dyslexic children are not broken, but too often the system designed to educate them is. Dare to change your school so that your child has the resources to thrive. Understanding your rights and finding allies will make you and your child feel connected and no longer alone.

Packed with practical ideas and strategies dyslexic children need for excelling in school and in life, this empowering guide provides the framework for charting a future for your child that is bright with hope and unlimited potential.

“Read Me Differently”

Filmmaker Sarah Entine was identified as having dyslexia as a child. But she doesn’t fully understand what that means until her late 20s. To explore her reading issues, she decides to interview her family. That’s when she discovers something about her mother and grandmother: They may have undiagnosed learning and attention issues. A lack of understanding has hurt relationships between family members for years. This documentary is an authentic look at how dyslexia can impact a family.

“Embracing Dyslexia”

This documentary had very personal beginnings. Director Luis Macias says, “I can’t take back … the many times I accused my son of being lazy and not trying hard enough. This film is my way of trying to prevent other children and their families from having to go through what we did.” In the movie, people with dyslexia, experts and parents explain what dyslexia feels like. They encourage early identification. And they stress how much support in school and at home can help kids.

“The Secret”

In this television movie, Mike (Kirk Douglas) has spent his entire life trying to hide his dyslexia. Only his best friend and his wife have ever known that he can’t read or write. As the owner of a general store, he’s been able to create workarounds for his issues. But when he’s nominated for local political office, he worries about how he can keep his secret under wraps. Then he learns his grandson also has trouble reading. And Mike has to confront his shame and accept his challenges for the sake of the boy—and his own future happiness.